Monday, October 22, 2012

Jefferson On The Conservatives



While we try to hide as many comments on this site from Conservative sheeplets (they are so distressingly similar in viciousness and intellectually challenged that one would swear that they come from the same keyboard), a common theme comes from many of them - that Conservatism is not a faux political philosophy, that our premise that Conservatism is a hideous criminal conspiracy with the underlying aim of the enhancement of power and wealth for the few, that its front group, the Republican "Party" really represents something more beneficial to the people than a cabal of those paid by the greediest and most power hungry of the upper class elites to undermine our democracy, that this 'something more' is a 'return to traditional values', a Christian-based morality, a call for personal responsibility, with other objectives including 'right to life,' 'States' rights,' 'balanced budgets and fiscal responsibility,' and a litany of other issues that are really smoke enveloping the underlying aim of the Conservative leadership - to return us to the feudalism of the Middle Ages.

Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, was probably the most brilliant of all of our forty four Presidents.  Fluent in Latin, Greek, and an expert on ancient Gaelic philology, he was also an accomplished architect, inventor, scientist, theologian, philosopher, farmer, agriculturalist, and skilled writer - of the Declaration of Independence, of course.


From an essay on Jacqueline Kennedy's showcasing of the arts while First Lady:

On April 29, 1962, the Kennedys hosted a dinner honoring fortynine of America's most distinguished educators, scientists, and artists, including several Nobel laureates. The guest list included Pearl S. Buck, Robert Frost, James Baldwin, Linus Pauling, Robert Oppenheimer, and John H. Glenn Jr. The assembled group was so distinguished that Jack called it “the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered together at the White House — with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.”

Jefferson wrote repeatedly on the difference between the parties of the rich and the "non-rich," and here are just a few of his writings that truly explain the truth behind the existence of the Republican Party, and by extension, the Conservative cabal:


"Men by their constitutions are naturally divided into two parties: 1. Those who fear and distrust the people, and wish to draw all powers from them into the hands of the higher classes. 2. Those who identify themselves with the people, have confidence in them, cherish and consider them as the most honest and safe, although not the most wise depositary of the public interests. In every country these two parties exist, and in every one where they are free to think, speak, and write, they will declare themselves. Call them, therefore, Liberals and Serviles, Jacobins and Ultras, Whigs and Tories, Republicans and Federalists, Aristocrats and Democrats, or by whatever name you please, they are the same parties still and pursue the same object. The last one of Aristocrats and Democrats is the true one expressing the essence of all." --Thomas Jefferson to Henry Lee, 1824.

"Men have differed in opinion and been divided into parties by these opinions from the first origin of societies, and in all governments where they have been permitted freely to think and to speak. The same political parties which now agitate the U.S. have existed through all time. Whether the power of the people or that of the [aristocracy] should prevail were questions which kept the states of Greece and Rome in eternal convulsions, as they now schismatize every people whose minds and mouths are not shut up by the gag of a despot. And in fact the terms of Whig and Tory belong to natural as well as to civil history. They denote the temper and constitution of mind of different individuals." --Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 1813.
"The division into Whig and Tory is founded in the nature of man; the weakly and nerveless, the rich and the corrupt, seeing more safety and accessibility in a strong executive; the healthy, firm, and virtuous, feeling confidence in their physical and moral resources, and willing to part with only so much power as is necessary for their good government; and, therefore, to retain the rest in the hands of the many, the division will substantially be into Whig and Tory." --Thomas Jefferson to Joel Barlow, 1802.

"The parties of Whig and Tory are those of nature. They exist in all countries, whether called by these names or by those of Aristocrats and Democrats, Cote Droite and Cote Gauche, Ultras and Radicals, Serviles and Liberals. The sickly, weakly, timid man fears the people, and is a Tory by nature. The healthy, strong and bold cherishes them, and is formed a Whig by nature." --Thomas Jefferson to Lafayette, 1823.


Jefferson had hope for democracy:

"I had always expected that when the republicans should have put down all things under their feet, they would schismatize among themselves. I always expected, too, that whatever names the parties might bear, the real division would be into moderate and ardent republicanism. In this division there is no great evil -- not even if the minority obtain the ascendency by the accession of federal votes to their candidate; because this gives us one shade only, instead of another, of republicanism. It is to be considered as apostasy only when they purchase the votes of federalists, with a participation in honor and power." --Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Cooper, 1807.

And these hopes were based on a dream that right would prevail over wrong:

"Both of our political parties, at least the honest portion of them, agree conscientiously in the same object: the public good; but they differ essentially in what they deem the means of promoting that good. One side believes it best done by one composition of the governing powers, the other by a different one. One fears most the ignorance of the people; the other the selfishness of rulers independent of them. Which is right, time and experience will prove. We think that one side of this experiment has been long enough tried and proved not to promote the good of the many, and that the other has not been fairly and sufficiently tried. Our opponents think the reverse. With whichever opinion the body of the nation concurs, that must prevail." --Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, 1804.

And not realizing the relentless quest by the Conservative upper class of the country, he had further hopes:

"I had always expected that when the republicans should have put down all things under their feet, they would schismatize among themselves. I always expected, too, that whatever names the parties might bear, the real division would be into moderate and ardent republicanism. In this division there is no great evil -- not even if the minority obtain the ascendency by the accession of federal votes to their candidate; because this gives us one shade only, instead of another, of republicanism. It is to be considered as apostasy only when they purchase the votes of federalists, with a participation in honor and power." --Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Cooper, 1807.

But in this, Jefferson erred.  He had no ability to see that centuries of power-grabbing by the Conservative leadership pawns and sycophants would slowly chip away at our democracy, that more and more wealth and power would be taken over by the greedier pigs in our social trough, and that sooner or later that there would be a need to criminalize Conservatism once and forever.

And it may be too late unless we criminalize Conservatism now!


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"Quotations will tell the full measure of meaning, if you have enough of them."

James Murray (Scottish lexicographer and philologist. He was the primary editor of the

Oxford English Dictionary from 1879 until his death. 1837 - 1915)

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